#TBT to the first (and probably not the last) time Tricia dressed up like a nerdy bear.

#TBT to the first (and probably not the last) time Tricia dressed up like a nerdy bear.

Memory Palace’s Nate DiMeo on history, Parks and Recreation and pop music

We picked the brain of one of our favorite podcasters: The Memory Palace’s Nate DiMeo. Nate talks about bringing history to life, writing for Parks and Recreation and what we can learn from pop music. Oh, and SPACE. Plus a potentially shocking Simpsons-related nerd confession. 

Nerdette Podcast is on: iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

classicpenguin:

A very happy birthday to the inimitable Dorothy Parker, in her day called “the wittiest woman of our time.” And indeed she remains the wittiest woman of our time as well.

humansofnewyork:

"There is a stigma in this country around women with jobs. So I want to start an organization that provides girls in the Congo with examples of women around the world who have balanced family and career. Most men in this country think it’s only about money. They think: ‘If I make enough money for us to live, then my wife should take care of the children.’ The common belief is that a woman who works is hurting her children. People don’t realize that children also gain from the knowledge and experiences of their mother."(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"There is a stigma in this country around women with jobs. So I want to start an organization that provides girls in the Congo with examples of women around the world who have balanced family and career. Most men in this country think it’s only about money. They think: ‘If I make enough money for us to live, then my wife should take care of the children.’ The common belief is that a woman who works is hurting her children. People don’t realize that children also gain from the knowledge and experiences of their mother."
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

Elizabeth Gilbert, polite botany, and Sex In Your Garden

Author Elizabeth Gilbert talks about corgis, fairies, and her latest book (which is about a lady botanist in the 1800s). And then, plant expert Angela Overy describes what makes our gardens inherently illicit.

Nerdette Podcast is on: iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

The History of Wonder Woman, author Lev Grossman and a tearful nerd confession

Author Lev Grossman on his new book The Magician’s Land, reviewing books for Time and raising nerdy kids. Then we get to know the story of Wonder Woman with comic historian Tim Hanley. And a tearful nerd confession about Chance the Rapper.

Nerdette Podcast is on: iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to win the Fields Medal

smartgirlsattheparty:

"Maryam Mirzakhani, a professor of mathematics at Stanford, has been awarded the 2014 Fields Medal, the most prestigious honor in mathematics. Mirzakhani is the first woman to win the prize, widely regarded as the "Nobel Prize of mathematics," since it was established in 1936."

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

Author Edan Lepucki and TLDR podcast’s PJ and Alex

New episode! A summer reading list from Edan Lepucki, breakout author of the novel California. Then the hosts of On the Media’s TLDR podcast stop by to chat about everything from explaining Reddit to old people to why Chipotle is a cruel mistress. Thanks for listening and sharing!

Nerdette Podcast is on: iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

theweekmagazine:

Sony is making a female superhero movie set in the Amazing Spider-Man universe